p1

The basis of a presentation (p1) is the data, the story, the message converted from a what to a “so what” for the specific audience. This section describes the construction of a story by an understanding of the audience needs, the value of the message, an elevator pitch, the arc of the story and development of sparklines. 

Effective communication

The purpose of a presentation is effective communication. Effective communication is not recitation of a list of facts. Effective communication is about a message. That message is only effective from the perspective of the audience. Effective communication is about converting…
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p1 is not a story, but the story.

p1 is the story not a story

Every presentation is made up of three parts; p1 the story, p2 the supportive media and p3 the delivery. p1 is not “a” story, once upon a time or somesuch, p1, “the” story is the data of the piece converted…
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Lessons from The Sensei (4) creativity

creativity lesson

In the 4th of a series of Lessons I learned from a presentation by Garr Reynolds (my Sensei) I’d like to consider creativity in presentations. Delivering a presentation is more than reading a list of facts. Changing the facts into…
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Lessons from The Sensei (2) Turn off the computer

turn off the computer

Continuing the series of thoughts I learned from The Sensei on design issues, perhaps the most important is to turn off the computer. The rationale behind this is clear, the results are immediately observable and yet few people will follow…
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Why are you presenting?

The most important question a presenter should address is “Why am I presenting?” The answer has nothing to do with your status, your previous presentations or your knowledge and everything to do with the audience. Recognising this is central to…
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Less is more. Again

less is more

Less is more. “Clean, uncluttered lines” is a design motif that appeals aesthetically. The same should be applied to the story (p1). More words, more facts, more explanation does not make more clarity, rather the converse. The aim should be to deliver…
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It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

The best books, the best films and the best presentations start with an attention grabber. “Good afternoon Ladies and Gentlemen. A retrospective review of prenatal ultrasound in South East Thames,” is unlikely to do that. If you grab the attention of…
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Acronyms rarely seem effective.

acronyms rarely seem effective

There are many effective and helpful tricks to maximising the impact of a presentation including the use of memes, themes, aliteration, analogy, allegory, rhetoric and repetition. Accronyms are a regularly used device but for them to be effective they must be memorable…
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On memes and themes and analogies

on memes and themes

When choosing to using a meme, theme or image in a presentation make sure that it is appropriate and easily understood for your audience. Improving the engagement and memorability of a presentation can be achieved by various tricks not the…
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Credit where credit is due.

credit where credit is due

In a previous post I recalled my sadness of hearing a colleague say “what he suggests is interesting, but I wouldn’t do it for an important presentation.” He was expressing the difficulty of change, the challenge of stepping out from…
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