p cubed

A presentation is made of three component parts; the story (p1), the supportive media (p2) and the delivery of these (p3). The value of a presentation is the product of these three factors, the p cubed value.

The three components are discussed in more depth under their individual sections. This section deals with the p cubed value, the product of preparation, design and delivery.

Some key posts include:

Your presentation is the product of its parts (The FIRST blog post)

The maths of a better presentation

Don’t put the cart before the horse

The p cubed value of a presentation

 

 

 

 

What should I do watching a bad presentation?

bad presentation

Sadly, with the desire to improve one’s presentations comes the realisation of how poor many presentations really are. With the connection that Twitter brings and the ability to receive wisdom from conferences far away also comes the feed of disastrous slides,…
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Hysteron proteron

hysteron proteron

Hysteron proteron is a figure of speech, probably inherited from the Greeks, where the object that should come second is put in first place; “to put the horse before the cart.” Another example would be preparing the supportive media (p2) for a…
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Practise is not just repetition

not just repetition

It is humbling to see the p cubed ideas being taken up and shared by others. A recent blogpost by a twitter friend Shane Gryzko reiterates a valuable point: there is more to a practise than simply repetition. Practise needs to be…
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The maths of presentations, preparations and time

The value of a presentation, in the view of the audience, is down to maths, the product of the story (p1), the supportive media (p2) and its delivery (p3). What does the other side of the equation hold, the side…
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People don’t present like that because…

why don't we present like that

In   response to a tweet publicising the recent podcast “Why do people present like this” one tweeter replied as below: Because it’s often a. Easy to understand b. Easier to remember c. Clear take home messages? Just not as…
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It all about the delivery

all about delivery

The best story in the world p1, supported by the most amazing media p2 is nothing if the delivery fails. This is the fear of every performer whether they are a presenter or one of the biggest rock stars in…
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Meanwhile, over at St Emlyn’s…

It is a pleasure to be a Visiting Professor at the virtual hospital of St Emlyn’s situated in the teeming metropolis that is Virchester. The “hospital” has some of the most eminent, hard working and caring professionals it has been my pleasure…
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On negative feedback

I have no monopoly on ideas on #presentationskills and so it was with pleasure I accepted this guest post from a friend and educator supreme Anand Swaminathan (known to the world as Swami) . It deals with feedback but principally the difficulty of…
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Lessons from The Sensei (3) beginner’s mind

beginner's mind

Do it the way you’ve always done it. You can do that, you’re not good enough. Where is the standard background? Not enough text. Use a pie chart. Make sure you put references at the bottom of the page. Read…
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Credit where credit is due.

credit where credit is due

In a previous post I recalled my sadness of hearing a colleague say “what he suggests is interesting, but I wouldn’t do it for an important presentation.” He was expressing the difficulty of change, the challenge of stepping out from…
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